Wolverton Works – Past and Present

Wolverton Railway Works was established in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, by the London and Birmingham Railway Company in 1838 at the midpoint of the 112 mile-long route from London to Birmingham. The line was developed by Robert Stephenson At first, the Works was used for maintenance and repairs of locomotives purchased from outside firms. Two locomotives were built there in 1845/6 and another in 1848, but following enlargement of the buildings and increased facilities, they were turned out in quantity.

A total of 166 locomotives were built at Wolverton, the last of them in September 1863. These included three varieties of the 2-2-2 ‘Bloomers’, 86 of the ‘Wolverton Express Goods’ 0-6-0 and four classes of 0-4-2. In 1846 the London & Birmingham became part of the London and North Western Railway. In 1862 a decision was taken to concentrate locomotive work at Crewe, and in 1865 Wolverton became the LNWR Carriage Works. It became the largest carriage works in Great Britain — and a major employer in the area for many years. P Webb

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About Phillip

I enjoy drawing/sketching in my spare time. I became a volunteer at Living Archive through being greatly interested in the history of Wolverton railway works, I have always had an interest in the works from a young boy as my grandpa worked in the offices. To me the history of Wolverton Railway Works is such an extraordinary and amazing thing. I am also michael jacksons biggest fan and have been from the age of 5
This entry was posted in Archive, Heritage, Places, Wolverton, Wolverton Works. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Wolverton Works – Past and Present

  1. Ian says:

    Phillip – I’m putting together some web pages on the history of the London & Birmingham Railway, and am currently dealing with Wolverton Works. Might I also ask where you obtained figures for the number of locomotives produced at Wolverton? I’ve seen a various numbers quoted, without too much consistency!

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